Stephen King's House


October 25, 2007 — During the spring of 1991, a man broke into Stephen King’s house, making a news item of himself for the benefit of us and a danger of himself to the detriment of the horror author. Based solely on the sheer number of them out there, odds are the intruder was a fan. Judging by his homemade bomb of calculator parts and cardboard, he was deranged. And while I don't at all condone the action, of course, I can understand it to a degree...because King's house is a really cool one. The rest I don't get, including both the crazy bit and the fan bit.

Despite the conflicted feelings toward his work that I will soon elucidate, he’s still a modern icon of horror, a genre of which I’ve been an appreciator long enough and to a degree that it often makes me doubt my place in civilized society. For that mere reason, I do have an interest in him. Mark me, interest and appreciation can be—and are in this case—on the opposite brims of a very wide punch bowl.


I guess that makes two reasons why I wanted to visit the place where he keeps his remote control and favorite pair of jeans. If it was just a stucco ranch house with a sprinkler and an election placard on the front lawn or an ostentatious modern atrocity of the Beverly Hills type, I doubt my interest would’ve been piqued at all. Oh, and if you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m using the word “visit” so loosely it almost doesn’t stick to the computer screen.

Now for a bit of full disclosure. Of King’s heft of work, I’ve read Carrie, ’Salem’s Lot, The Shining, Night Shift, Rage, the first half of Danse Macabre, The Mist, and one other short-story anthology that I can’t seem to remember the title of, in addition to numerous random essays and articles. Even though that experience slants mostly to his earlier work and is such a small percentage of his libratic oeuvre, I believe that’s still enough to develop some communicable idea on his work. Besides, most of my ideas about anything usually lack anything approximating an appropriate scope. I’m okay with that. It just means that I’m often wrong.

Oh, and I’ve seen just about every movie and miniseries based on his work, purely out of cinematic addiction. Obviously, that has no real bearing on my opinion of him as a writer or storyteller, but it does give me insight into the way he likes to check off horror clich├ęs as book ideas.


Here’s the thing about King and I. I’ve never not been entertained by a Stephen King book. And while that’s a great standard for judging a dinner party, it’s not exactly a good standard for judging valuable literature. His style of writing is completely facile, and it’s suspiciously easy to get from sentence to sentence. He definitely keeps my attention, but so do a lot of demonstrably worthless things, so I can’t use that as any measurement of worth, either. He writes from a real place, his dialogue is natural, and his characters live, although when you bloat a novel like he does and end up spending so much time with them, they’d probably feel real inevitably.

My big problem with King’s books, though, is that I always feel empty after finishing one. Granted, in general I’m a cavernous hollow that reverberates every idea, feeling, and memory into sad loops that bounce painfully off my insides like detached Pong pixels, but nevertheless I usually need to wrestle with literature, and I want it to beat me every time. I want it to change me. His work, though, seems to lack denseness, thorniness, complexity, originality. All the things about literature that make it make us better people. When you’re done with a Stephen King book, you’re done with it. That’s also how I describe Three’s Company episodes. Except that I do end up re-watching those. 

He doesn’t seem to have that annoying internal editor that tells you that you’re talking too much or that an idea isn’t valid just because you have it. I know. I’m looking at the word count for this article. Pot. Kettle. Black.

I’d also like to say that my official stance on his work has nothing to do with any habitual distaste for the popular, either. I do have that, certainly, but I like to fool myself into thinking I’m not ruled by it. I haven’t met a person who doesn’t find Scrubs funny, and I’ll admit to watching it to anybody. Which, I guess is what I just did.

On the plus side, King’s horror advocacy has always made me like him, although he usual defends the genre on pretty simplistic terms, as a healthy outlet for man’s unhealthy tendencies. Still, though, even though he kind of has to, he does defend the genre. In fact, I think he’s at his best in his nonfiction work, actually. His ability to compose clear, natural prose in an amiable manner is perfect for that kind of writing. The introductions to his books often interest me more than the books themselves.

I do kind of feel bad about the last few paragraphs, partly because I said a lot of vague negative things about his work without backing them up, and partly because I’m sure I’ve not said anything that hasn’t been said before by his critics, so let’s move on to his house, over which I will rave.

Now, I’ve suffered the self-imposed embarrassment of standing in front of my share of famous houses for pictures (I hate calling what I’m doing “posing”...it’s more like just taking up space in a frame). Blackbeard’s, Lovecraft’s, Shakespeare’s, Lizzie Borden’s. This is the first time I’ve (sigh) posed in front of a living person’s house, though. Felt uncomfortable like stalking, even if my pockets weren't filled with cardboard and calculator parts.

His house is located in the basically Canadian state of Maine, just outside of downtown Bangor at 47 West Broadway. The surrounding neighborhood is way more inviting than I would have thought. The houses are all large and expensive-looking, but they’re close to the street, which is itself wide and open, and a public sidewalk does what public sidewalks do directly in front of them. I totally see the appeal of living in the place. It’s highly accessible, and you can go there without feeling like the neighborhood watch is burning sideways 8’s into your back with binoculars.

Stephen King’s house is red with white trim, old enough to look historic, and absolutely towers over you. Despite that last, it does look smaller than you’d think it would from the front, but it reaches back far enough that you can’t mistake it as anything but a mansion. It’s also in complete full view and not at all hidden behind the small wrought-iron gate that envelopes the place.

Speaking of which, Robert Frost once wrote something about cool fences making cool neighbors, so based on just that, King must be a hit at the neighborhood yard sales. It’s also a big reason why this house’s appearance is so notable. Spiders, bat-winged creatures, and a three-headed reptile all decorate the black wrought-iron in natural and subtle ways. And by natural and subtle I mean not annoying. It’s exactly something you’d hope a nice guy steeped in horror stories would do to his house. Acknowledge who he is without megaphoning it around.


King wasn’t home. I know this because while I was sitting across the street in my car with its obvious out-of-state plates trying to screw up the courage to be mistaken for a Stephen King fan, a tour bus arrived, out of which jumped about five camera-handed people in raincoats (because it was raining), which definitely put me in perspective and made it even harder to get out of the car.

I think I’ve heard somewhere that the tour bus is only allowed to stop by when King’s not home. Also, that night was game one of the MLB American League Championship Series between the Boston Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians. It was in Boston, and apparently Mr. King is Rain Man about attending Red Sox games. An anti-war sign was staked into the front lawn and the front gate was closed, but a side driveway gate was open, down which was parked a champagne-colored Mercedez Benz.

I want to like Stephen King’s work in a defensible way. I want to back anybody that pushes the horror cause forward as much as he has. Plus I just like spooky tales. I can't, though. I definitely don’t hate him. Not in the way I hate most New York Times best-selling authors and certainly not to the point of bombs made of cardboard and calculator parts. But even though I still don’t really like his work, I do love his house. That’s some consolation for me.

Read about my visit to some Stephen King movie filming sites in Maine...after you drop a comment below about how much both this article and my taste in literature suck, of course.

64 comments:

  1. try reading some of his post-near-death work. With the huge exception of the horrible way he ended the Dark Tower series, he has fabulous stories in his head and doesn't always have diarrhea of the words

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    1. Agreed. King is decent, but the Dark Tower series ended with an enormous thud.

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  2. read some of his work

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  3. I feel bad for you that you think you need to be "moved" by reading. Sometimes it's okay to just do it for fun....

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  4. The Dark Tower ended perfectly, get over it.

    And I agree try reading for pleasure, literary crit from someone running a "spook" website.. Please..

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  5. I am a huge Stephen King fan and collector of many of his books. I say collector as, even though I would say he is one of my favorite authors, I have yet to finish a book of his read by me and not narrated by a celebrity.I know shame on me. Well my bad =)

    Now that being said oops typed, this website has compelled you to browse it and read it then comment about it. Which is what the author of this web page (in my opinion) wanted to accomplish. You will inevitably go and tell your friends what an idiot you feel this man J.W. Ocker is. Which will gain him more clicks to visit his webpage. After all that passion and time spent on this webpage. Shame on you because then you don't even have the common courtesy to leave your names or some semblence of identity. At least if you post a critism have the courage of your convictions to leave a marker of your visit.

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  6. Wow! What an idiot! If you want literary go read Shakespeare. It really ticks me off when some fool comes down the pike slamming people that they only wish they could be. It’s obvious that you don’t know jack about fun “fiction” or it’s purpose. So, you don’t care for King but your posing outside the guys house? Don’t make me laugh looser. I just wonder how many calculator parts and cardboard pieces we would find in you panty drawer J.W.??

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    1. Bwahaha - way to go I am 100% behind you on this statement Tim. Your writing is much more cohesive than this idiots idea of a blog or whatever it is he is trying to pull off as I don't have the patience or the time to figure out what this wanna be is up to here. I would like to add my own thoughts to yours if you don't mind and here we go:
      You, stalker dude, go ahead and wrestle with literature as it is apparent that you have a lot to learn. I am sure Mr. Stephen King isn't wrestling with a thing, and he isn't creeping about outside of someone's home. You are like one of those annoying kids from junior high school who raises their hands so they can be called on to talk and NOBODY CARED then [what you have to say] aside from being annoyed, nor do we now. I can't believe I just waisted my time reading your crap - and just like the kids in school; you have received what you so needed; attention albeit negative. He is best on his non-fiction work? You must be mental. LkH

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  7. I'm not a big Stephen King fan either, but I do think his book "On Writing" is full of helpful advice for would be writers like me and I've always "liked him". I have yet to read The Dark Towers books and have wanted to for awhile if only because his advice hit home with me in so many ways in my struggles.

    I do have to say I love your blog and you're a great writer yourself. I will definitely need to read some more and will!

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    1. YOU LOVE THIS IDIOTS BLOG? OMG; there are so many people with affected (infected?) brains walking amongst us, it is so pathetic. And you think this dumb asses writing is better than Stephen Kings? LMFAO; and so is Stephen King, all the way to the bank, and to the fulfillment of his dreams, which doesn't carry a price tag.

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  8. The ironic part of this whole piece is that the red house in these photos isnt even really Stephen Kings house. LOL LOL...Yes he owns it,yes its on his property, but the house he actually lives in is the white house next to the red house surrounded by the same iron fence. So while all these crazy fans are gawking outside his red house"for show," hes actually next door laughing his ass off at all of these idiots!! HA HA HA

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    1. Hehehehe... terribly funny.

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  9. Stephen King... where to start? I so wish I had the time to compose an ode to The King of Horror... gosh that would be grand!

    Thanks for this. You summed up my thoughts on the man, the author and the legend almost to a T. Although as much as I love the movies based on his work, I must prefer the made for TV movies or mini series on TV that he seems to have a greater involvement with to make them more... more.

    Again; thank-you for this!!!!

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  10. Tempting as it is to ramble on about how I sort of disagree, I'll just save us both the wasted time and only say one thing: I've seen Scrubs. I didn't think it was funny.

    :)

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  11. I want to see what's in that house...

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  12. It's bizarre, but I agree with the last poster. I'm a very big Stephen King fan and I would have to say one of the most enjoyable things I've read by him is On Writing. It was candid, humorous, and eye-opening. That said, there have been plenty of books he's written that I didn't fully enjoy. Some that I would NEVER recommend to anyone else (Insomnia, anyone? Ugh. That was a lot of time I'll never get back.) And I HATE HATE HATE HATE nearly every single piece of movie or television work that has been produced based on his writing. It's a SHAME to see his craft bastardized the way it has. I'm still holding out for *the* movie that thrills me as much as reading one of his books has.

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    1. You do realize that Mr. King is in full participation with almost every movie or tv piece that has been created for that type of media - usually playing a small cameo part in it. Of course they are not like the books they are based on, the books are still there, go re-read them... it is a different medium handled in a different way for a different audience. Duh...

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  13. To continually label Stephen King as a horror writer is just wrong. He is not writing horror. He is writing a believable story that has scary elements to it.

    To say that you aren't moved by his writings just means that you are probably not even paying attention to the actual plot.

    I was deeply moved by 'Salem's Lot at IT especially and to just read from the origins of King and then pretend you know what he's all about is just insulting and arrogant.

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    1. Hi, Richard - completely agree that Stephen King is not a horror writer at all, rather a writer with the spookier pieces added. His stories are incredible and engaging, and I also was moved by the same books you were with 'Salem's Lot and IT, not to mention Lisey's Story, and several of his short fiction. His latest time-travel epic 11/22/63 certainly was a good one to bring in the non-fans or those who always labeled him as a horror writer.

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  14. i love stephen king, love his work, ive got a hugh collection of his books,ive read everyone of them from front cover to ending. i however do not agree with everything you`ve said in this article, these are the 1 st. photos i seen of his home, its awsome and i am not disapointed, this is some of many ideas i thought his home would look like. maby more horrid, but nothing less horid. great home mr. king,!

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  15. Also, to the poster above me, I agree. To watch Stephen King adaptations and then say you can see what King was doing, isn't right in the least.

    Most King adaptations usually end up being butchered by the people working on them and they don't turn out anything like the novel.

    The writer of this article needs to revise his article so he doesn't look like he knows all about Stephen King.

    However, Insomnia, I found, was a fantastic read. Also in my prior post I meant 'Salem's Lot and IT not at IT.

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  16. nothing better than a dark stormy night, lots of thunder and lightening, curled up in my chair under a blanket,cup of jo, and a stephen king novel!! the best of the bestest!!
    the novels always so much more, way better than his movies, mini series, whichever. loving it all the way through!

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  17. Stephen King is a genius. You suck, and scrubs is not funny. I stopped reading your exceedingly boring article right after the sentence where you said you watched it because any opinion you have on popular culture, literature, film, or television from there on is worthless, like you.

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  18. I was moved by the Dark Tower series. The first time I read it, I was disappointed with the ending. So,I read it again. Twice. Now I think it was a most perfect ending. I love the corners of my mind that reading it helped me find. They didn't leave me feeling empty at all, they left me feeling very enightened about what matters and what doesn't. Maybe they wouldn't do the same for you, however, if you haven't read them, go for it. If nothing else you will be entertained. I strongly recommend that if they ever try to put it on tv, in any manner, you find something else to do instead of watching it. I CANNOT imagine doing The Dark Tower Series justice w a miniseries or a movie. Just my opinion.

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  19. yes, this article and your taste in literature suck. I have every book Stephen King wrote, and seen every movie/miniseries. I find his books extremely entertaining, scary, and i have read most of them twice. Get a life/

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  20. "His style of writing is completely facile, and it’s suspiciously easy to get from sentence to sentence."

    While your style of writing on the other hand is boring while trying to appear clever.

    "His work, though, seems to lack denseness, thorniness, complexity, originality...When you’re done with a Stephen King book, you’re done with it."

    Utter rubbish. The Stand, Under the Dome, The Dark Tower series (to name but a few) - all brilliant, full of vibrant, complex characters and entirely re-readable.

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  21. It's all fair criticism. We all have our reading taste. I just love someone who knows how to tell a great story, whether it's a "literary" writer or a Stephen King. I would suggest, if you're interested, reading King's "On Writing". It's recommended reading by some pretty good authors.

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  22. Facile? You sound like a boob. I wouldn't like you if this article was slamming Justin Beiber.

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  23. Stephen King has managed to thrill and entertain me for many years...People will do what people will do and if that means you collect his books and read them over again then good on you because you are doing what you want to do!! My favorite is Lisey's Story but unfortunatly I lost that one in my divorce...but I digress. I love this article and kudo's to you for writing it and not basing it on how you think it should be written but on your honest opinion on how you feel. Not everyone will like what you do, but it is obvious that you are comfortable in your skin and do not really need to worry about what others think of what you have written. Carry on!!!

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  24. Like another poster above said, you haven't read anything of his after 1990...big mistake. I do admit I'm a huge fan so forgive my bias, but you must realize most authors do (should?) get better with age. I will admit that almost every tv/movie incarnation of his work leaves me empty and unsatisfied....I always prefer the book (cliche, I know! but in this case, true.) Yet there is one movie I always recommend because it was as good as the book....Shawshank Redemption. Please, please read this and tell me your not a fan. Not horror, granted, but if you want to judge him as a writer at least give him a shot.

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  25. Halfway through 11/22/63 and I'm wishing it were twice as long because I don't want it to end. Stephen King is an amazing story teller and, to me, it's the details that make a great story!!

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  26. I managed to stay (mostly) awake and get through your article. You seem to say Stephen King is long winded, boring and his endings incomplete. You are definitely "the pot calling the kettle black". Enlighten yourself and read The Green Mile or The Shawshank redemption.

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  27. shiroijin You should have referenced The Green Mile as a movie based on the Stephen King novel. It was nearly as good as Shawshank Redemption in it's depiction of the written word. Like others, the only thing I don't like about a Stephen King book is coming to the end.

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  28. @Anonymous 11:45am - You're so right! And at least there is a bit of supernatural in Green Mile that J.W. Ocker may appreciate, which is 'missing' from Shawshank.

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  29. I think you are an idiot. I didn't even finish reading your drive. Stephen King is one of the best writers ever. I, personally do not consider his stories horror. They are VERY well written novels with some creepy elements. The green mile and Stand by Me are two examples of how beautiful some of his work is!! The story of Carrie was about an abused girl taking her revenge on the people that treated her so cruelly. The shining was about a man losing his mind. You obviously have not paid attention to the stories or you wouldn't have written such unkind words about a master storyteller. The girl who Loved Tom Gordon was about a little girl lost in the woods, who was able to survive the night, by holding on to her childhood hero. I have not read, even one book of his that I feel can be truly called a horror story. He writes with humor, feeling and imagination. I wish I were so wonderfully blessed. You sir, suck!!!

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  30. Bravo, Mr. Ocker! It seems you've managed to to find a way to increase your blog hits exponentially by using SK's house as a magnet. Though you spend less time actually discussing his domecile than offering the world your sour-grapes POV based on the books you actually read (few of which actually are among his best works, IMHO), you do prove that excessive wordiness is not exclusively the domain of Mr. King. I realize that using one of the world's most popular writers as a carrot to drive up blog hits must have represented a kind of double-edged sword for you, since you're not only not a fan, but also someone who probably has to listen to the legions of fans telling you why your criticisms are as bereft of content as you claim Mr. King's writing is. Nonetheless, I'm sure this article gained you many hits, mostly by those interested in his house (not your peanut-gallery critique - which comes off like a pissed off puddle condemning an ocean). Looking forward to your next post, which will undoubtably inform us on how J.K Rowling's shallow story-telling is at odds with the lustrous brand of shampoo she uses...

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  31. I find it interesting that a travel guide writer has the gall to critique a real writer. This author admits that he has a inherent hatred of all things popular but claims it is not so in this case. His writing even has the facade of being clever, yet anyone with an IQ above room temperature in a freezer can tell he hasn't got an original idea in his head. It is easy to bash someone at the top. Stephen King has been compared to Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. In the years to come Stepen King will be remembered as a prominent and entertaining author. While Ocker might appear on half a page on wikipedia whose most famous literary work was a guide to New England and a blog bashing real writers.

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    1. Go get him! :) He deserves every negative comment that I have read, this guy, well I am not wasting anymore time on this... I can't find one person who seems to like this blogger in addition the ones that support his views (if you can call them that) they don't have any original thought or IQ above a pre-pubescent child's. This guy is a drain on the reader's brain and time so I will not waist anyone elses time by replying to anything else positive or negative. It is what it is and there seems a sharp line of divide here; one side of it is that of intelligence and class; the other side isn't worthy of description we all know what idiot is.

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  32. All I want to say is, I love Stephen King! And if you don't you suck!

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  33. My first King book was The Stand in paperback. I couldn't stop reading (because it was such a fantastic real-but-not-really story; and almost couldn't turn the next page due to avoid "living through" the next trouble.
    And that was about 32 years ago.

    Now to compare you and King -- I could not read your paragraphs (if I have to read something 3 times to understand what is being said, it quit it). Your writing only gave me the opportunity to look at the pictures of King's house in Bangor. :-)

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  34. Everyone to his own taste. I have been reading King novels since the 80s. My first novel was The Shining. After that, I was hooked. An English professor mentioned staying up all night to finish King's book It. I purchased this book and have re-read it several times. The book It, like The Stand and Under the Dome, are books I navigate back to and re-read. With each reading, there is always something new. Just like a previous blogger, there's nothing better than a King book on a dark, stormy night.

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  35. I LOVE MR, KING AND HIS COLLECTIONS OF BOOKS ARE FASCINATING FROM MY POINT OF VIEW, FOR ME A WRITER HAS TO HOLD MY ATTENTION AND KEEP ME INTERESTED, BUT THEN I HAVE A TENDENCY TO READ EVERYTHING THAT FALLS IN MY HANDS. WE DON'T ALL HAVE TO LOVE MR. KING, BUT WE SHOULD ALL BE HAPPY FOR THE DIVERSITY AND DIFFRENT POINT OF VIEW IN THIS WORLD.

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  36. like him,don't like him,like,don't like.......make up your mind fool!you're just a bitter wanna be!oh! and get over yourself?

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  37. you really should read his books, dude. and start from the beginning, when he wrote under the name richard bachman. he is a great writer and an awesome story teller. he can scare me with his words more than watching a movie. i am jealous though,i used to camp up in maine and I never saw his place, or ever got a chance to meet him. so u got closer than i ever did.

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  38. How you can judge a writer with such a vast catalogue of work over just a few books is beyond me. I would not use any of the books you named (maybe the Shining) to hold up as definitive of his career, even though they are much loved by most king fans. I highly recommend reading the following: Needful Things, Tommyknockers, Duma Key, The Long Walk, The Stand, IT, Desperation, From a Buick 8. If you still don't like him after reading 3 of these, ok, then you can say you're not a fan.

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  39. LOL. The comments here provide stunning proof that Americans really don't understand subtlety, irony, or humour. This blog post is awesome. The author is obviously a much greater fan than any of the outraged people commenting here. Stephen King is a smart guy – I’m sure if he read it he’d be laughing his arse off too.

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  40. Unmoved?! Have you ever read the Green Mile?????

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  41. I love Stephen King, when I was 20 or so he got me started reading; and since then I have read all different kinds of books....I still read his books, some I have read over and over again...yes, he is GREAT!!!

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  42. I've read all his books, liked most of them and loved many of them. His more recent work is better than his early books in my opinion. Starting with Duma Key, I've loved them all. Under the Dome is great and his latest, 11/22/63 is awesome. I haven't finished it yet as I don't have much time for reading right now, but I do suggest you give him another shot. I think you would be surprised. I LOVE STEPHEN KING.

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  43. I've read all his books, liked most of them and loved many of them. His more recent work is better than his early books in my opinion. Starting with Duma Key, I've loved them all. Under the Dome is great and his latest, 11/22/63 is awesome. I haven't finished it yet as I don't have much time for reading right now, but I do suggest you give him another shot. I think you would be surprised. I LOVE STEPHEN KING.

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  44. I've read all his books, liked most of them and loved many of them. His more recent work is better than his early books in my opinion. Starting with Duma Key, I've loved them all. Under the Dome is great and his latest, 11/22/63 is awesome. I haven't finished it yet as I don't have much time for reading right now, but I do suggest you give him another shot. I think you would be surprised. I LOVE STEPHEN KING.

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  45. Stephen King is an excellent writer, but The Dark Tower ended with an enormous thud.

    btw, Scrubs is not funny.

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  46. Read "Under the Dome"

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  47. Stephen king is an amazing author and should be talked about by people who actually READ his stuff. I myself own Danse Macabre, Carrie, The Shining, Under the Dome, Different Seasons, Insomnia, It, and many other novels completed by him. I also own a signed copy of 11/22/63, which I received when he came to visit a highschool nearby where I live. Let the praise come from the real fans

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  48. From your article, I got that you believe yourself to be a better writer with better taste.
    Never heard of you. I came here to look at Stephen King's house and didn't need you to stand in front of it. I read your article hoping you were going to talk to King or give us a tour. Basically, you used the fact that he has so many fans to try to get your name and face out there. This smacks of petty jealousy.
    Back to the real subject which should not be you, but King Stephen. Cujo, oddly enough, is one of the most touching books I ever read. It, better than any other book I've read, lyrically exposes the fear parents have in knowing that they can't protect their child from everything. It's so brilliant that, even though I haven't read it in years, I can never forget it. He spoke so well for all of us.

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  49. From your article, I got that you believe yourself to be a better writer with better taste.
    Never heard of you. I came here to look at Stephen King's house and didn't need you to stand in front of it. I read your article hoping you were going to talk to King or give us a tour. Basically, you used the fact that he has so many fans to try to get your name and face out there. This smacks of petty jealousy.
    Back to the real subject which should not be you, but King Stephen. Cujo, oddly enough, is one of the most touching books I ever read. It, better than any other book I've read, lyrically exposes the fear parents have in knowing that they can't protect their child from everything. It's so brilliant that, even though I haven't read it in years, I can never forget it. He spoke so well for all of us.

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  50. Wow, dude. You had the balls to look up where Stephen King lived, go to his house, and use his fame to drive traffic to his blog... but you don't have either the decency or discipline to do a modicum of research into what King books you might read that could really get you thinking. Very, very lazy. A guy who writes as many novels as King has is going to write some fluff, because he's a guy who *can't help but write* and sometimes, yes, he does it for fun, because an idea crosses his mind that won't shut up. Take a look at how many die-hard fans the guy has... We're not fans of his work because we want to find out if Bella is going to choose Edward or the werewolf, and not even because of any one particular gross out scene, or because we're popcorn-munching imbeciles. We're fans because this man is the Shakespeare of modern literature!!! Congratulations to Neil Gaiman and a handful of other authors for being able to tackle horror and have some popular success.... without Stephen King, it wouldn't have happened. The man is not a horror writer - he is a living, breathing, cultural milestone and almost unquestionably the most important fiction writer of the second half of the 20th century!!!! I can tell from your pictures that you're a young guy - so before you start accusing Stephen King of ticking off horror cliches, you might take just the briefest of moments to reflect on the fact that *he invented* 90%+ of the cliches you probably take for granted. How did you like the sucker punch in Alien? Aliens? Wouldn't have happened if Carrie's hand hadn't popped out of a grave after a few minutes of soft, symphonic music. How about creepy twin girls? Also, do you like Jack Nicholson? Maybe not, because his performances may not have caused you to wrestle around in your hollow cave of existence. But if you do, thank Stephen King, and he didn't even like the Shining. Jack would have been Jack, but he would NEVER have been Johnny, if it hadn't been for Stanley Kubrick finding *a whole hell of a lot of substance* in a King novel and using it to make his arguably most iconic film. How about "Stand By Me" and it's gigantic influence? These are all cultural milestones that have impacted countless generations. You are, yourself, a horror cliche and probably owe much to the guy's influence. Twilight hasn't influenced popular culture this way. Harry Potter hasn't influenced popular culture. They've influenced MARKET culture. King's writing has forever changed literature, film, and the perception of small towns in America. Stephen King's brain has fundamentally changed the way people look at the world. Do you like John Carpenter? Check out "in the mouth of madness." Stephen King has *actually done* what "Sutter Kane" does in the movie: he has altered reality.

    You may think that cheeseburgers aren't a worthwhile food because you don't have a whole complexity of subtle notes to bounce around on your palette - but don't fool yourself into thinking that just because you've had a few McDonald's burgers, you know everything there is to know about cheeseburgers - let alone how gourmet they can be, or how the cheeseburger has REVOLUTIONIZED the world.

    If you're going to write an article exploiting the house of the dude who invented the modern horror genre of literature to drive traffic to your personal blog, you really might want to try... y'know... doing more than "zero research" if you're going to spend 3/4 of your piece deriding his work. Because you really do come across as a vacuous, unthinking moron who, despite filibustering with a bunch of fancy words, doesn't have a single informed, hard-won thought in his head.

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  51. *this blog, not his blog

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  52. Stephen King is amazing.

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  53. All I have to say is that I dozed off in the second paragraph. I have never fallen asleep reading any of SK's books.

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  54. I love Stephen King! Always have and always will. Say whatever you want. Won't change my mind!!!

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  55. I find Stephen King's writing very interesting. His characterizations are very rich, and I have found myself immersed in these characters. I have rarely enjoyed the endings of his books, and ask myself why I haven't learned my lesson by now after each time I end a book. I am not saying I have not enjoyed his books, but some endings I thought were just thrown together to finish the book.

    The one thing I found extremely interesting was his criticisms in Dance Macabre. I know in "The Stand" he made a few mistakes, such as one character knowing another's name without being introduced, and describing another character's eyes as brown at one time, at another they are green. I wonder when we have read about him criticizing others (poor Britney comes to mind) if he was drinking, as I have heard at least one friend of his state that he has been known to drink to heavily. I hope that is truly in the past for him.

    All in all Mr. King is a great writer, not perfect but really enjoyable to read for the most part. He is however just human, just like the author of this blog is. The angry responses to the blog author by some of SK's fans speak of hero worship, which is amusing, and somewhat scary. I find that type of devotion almost cult like instead of rational. Truly everyone has an opinion, so why visit a blog and blast the author for his opinion?

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