Stopping by a Haunted House: The Walloomsac Inn

September 22, 2012 — I’ve been known to get the spooks here and there, but the last time I really Scooby-jumped into somebody’s arms was when I saw the Walloomsac Inn…from the outside, in broad daylight.


If you’re in the town of Bennington, and you don’t live or work there, then you’re probably heading for Old Bennington Cemetery behind the Old First Church to see Old Robert Frost’s grave.

The idyllic white church is located at 1 Monument Circle, but directly across the circle, a mere couple dozen or so steps away, is this massive, decay-gray building that was once the Walloomsac Inn. The edifice is three stories of cracked windows, crooked shutters, and rotting boards, making the close arrangement of the two buildings the architectural equivalent of an angel on one shoulder and a devil on the other.


Such an obviously haunted and tragedy-filled house shouldn’t be set so prominently in the middle of the town’s top tourist spot like it is. It should be on the outskirts, down an overgrown road past a cemetery and a swamp. But there it stands, like somebody dragged the town skeleton out of its closet and found out it was made of two-by-fours.

The inn was built in 1771 by a Captain Elijah Dewey, who was the son of one of the ministers at the Old First Church. From there, it got passed through a few families where it was added onto and given its current name. The last owner was Walter Berry, who bought it in 1891. They say presidents have stayed at the inn, the ones most often cited being Rutherford B. Hayes and William Henry Harrison, as well as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, who stayed there before they were presidents.


But stuff rots. And sometimes stuff rots in the middle of town. That’s not the astounding part. Nor is the fact that the Walloomsac Inn is still privately owned (although obviously not maintained), when you’d think that such an historic structure would be owned and maintained by the town. But here’s the kicker. People live there. Cannibals, I assume. Or at least the characters from that Home episode of The X-Files. Walking by, we saw a few fresh plants and a nice blue birdhouse adorning the porch. From what I’ve read online, the ones who still live there are the descendants of Walter Berry himself.

Unfortunately, “what I’ve read online” is oddly sparse. I figure that a structure as prominent, historic, and startling as the Walloomsac Inn would have multiple in-depth fan sites dedicated to it, and that the local paper would be running daily articles chronicling its deterioration.

That said, it’s an enigma I don’t really want solved. Because I like it as a spooky, mysterious pile of wood. I wish we would have documented it better on our own visit, but we were there for Frost’s bones and his neighbor here took us completely by surprise. I even forgot to get my picture taken with it. I've never done that before.




51 comments:

  1. I now want to go on a road trip from Tennessee just to see this house! Great pictures!

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    1. Me too... This looks like and awesome house... And would surely be and adventure going to see it...

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    2. I just drove by this house over Labor Day weekend & was absolutely amazed. I was captivated by the size and age of the building on the front side and noticed that it indeed looked quite lived in at the moment which was even more outstanding given the decay of the structure. I instantly thought it looked like a great place to have a haunted house & would have loved to seen the inside.
      What was even more impressive is when you turned the corner and realized how much larger it was on the back side. As soon as I could I looked it up and found out the background. Something so impressive should be open to the public again. I know the current owners like to keep to themselves but maybe someday that will change.

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    3. A year ago I stopped by with two dozen roses, had a nice talk with the lady of the house but was not invited inside and I didn't ask. She is a nice lady that wants her privacy.

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    4. Listen there was mysterios deaths in 1945-1950. This home is the creepiest it gets. I have lived here my whole life in bennington an been by that building millions of times an never ever one time has any one ever seen a singleeperson in o out of there but there are lights on some times at night or noises. If any one wants special pictures like inside the wallomsac I can arrange somthing just email me at hailey62511@gmail.com.

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  2. I would so film a low budget horror movie there! Great article, and awesome pictures!

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  4. We have a similar house here in Cleveland, Ohio. It's called Franklin's Castle. Very gruesome things happened in the house. Very evil things as well. It's made of stone and is dark. We have a street called Millionair's Row which this home sits on. I will be doing a blog about it just in time for the Season. I wanted to be a follower on your blog but you don't have a Google Friend Connect Widget on your blog. Please stop by my blog and follow! I love Halloween and things of dark history. Keep In Touch!

    Annamaria

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    1. I drive past Franklin's Castle every day on the way to work, and I happened to drive past this place in Bennington today, and this place makes Franklin's Castle look small and well-maintained in comparison (even before the current owners of Franklin's Castle). I was in awe today, and made my husband drive past it 2-3 times. Breathtaking.

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  5. Terrific job identifying this building! We drove past it ourselves earlier this year and I posted a couple of photos on my blog -- http://www.papergreat.com/2012/07/creepy-and-dilapidated-structures-of.html -- but didn't do the same level of legwork that you did to uncover the historical information. ... I'll put up a new link to your work and photos here.

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    1. Ha. Legwork. That's the best euphemism for Google search I've ever read...

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    2. LOL. I'm usually pretty good at the Google searches, and I did make an effort to find out about this place. You fared much better than I did. ... Still, as you note, it's interesting how little info is available on this historic structure.

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  6. Have you read "We have Always Lived in the Castle" by Shirley Jackson (one-time resident of Bennington, VT)? I believe it was set in a town based on Bennington. This house is exactly as I pictured the house in the story down to the looking empty but lived-in description. If you have not read it, do so now.

    Also her "The Haunting of Hill House" was in a house like that...

    Thanks for posting this. I must visit Bennington. I tried to get my daughter to to visit Bennington College on her college tour, but she was not interested even though she loves Shirley Jackson's books.

    Jackson's books on raising her kids in Bennington are quite humorous.

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    1. Yeah, definitely. My overarching purpose for visiting Bennington when I saw this was to see some Shirley Jackson sites for the New England Grimpendium.

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  7. Thank you so much for taking the time to capture this wonderful glimpse of opulent history. The degradation of the structure is enhanced by the precarious fire escape on the left. Haunting.

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  8. Ha! I never knew! I drove by this a few times while visiting Bennington College, but I just assumed it was the usual run of the mill creepy VT building. Thanks!

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  9. Very cool, and good information. That's also the same town as R. John Wright has his workshop in.. I think my father now has a reason to go there besides doll collecting lolz!

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  10. Wow that Inn looks so completely and utterly forlorn and haunted- it's as if a Hollywood set designer specifically built it that way. I MUST get to Bennington (and New England in general) someday. I actually get all my plates from there.

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  11. Pretty cool, indeed! Amazing that people still live there. Doesn't even look remotely safe to be occupied. Must be a strange place to enter. Would love to go in and have a look around.

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  12. Pretty cool, indeed! Amazing that people still live there. Doesn't even look remotely safe to be occupied. Must be a strange place to enter. Would love to go in and have a look around.

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  13. Don't trash this incredible historic building or the amazingly sweet woman who lives there. I've lived in Bennington my whole life and I've been inside, and it is very nice. Don't judge a book by it's cover, sir. It is her house, and rightfully so. The town was built around this building, we obviously didn't place an old decrepit building in the middle of town, I'm sorry that bothers you. But fortunately, your opinion matters little to the people of Bennington.

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    1. I work in Bennington and hear complaints about this place more often than you think. It's an eyesore and a shame that the owners have totally disregarded it's history.

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    2. Hi, I am a retired banker and avid photographer living in Brattleboro, Vermont. I would love to be able to document the interior of the Inn, I am sure it is a living, breathing time capsule. How can I make this happen?

      Many thanks!

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  14. I used to live in Bennington and I always wondered what it looked like inside The Walloomsac Inn.

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  15. Did you miss the Monument up the hill from the Inn? OK, it's a Revolutionary War monument, but you can go inside, and I always found it eerie inside. The Inn is an eyesore, and should have been preserved and maintained, but the Bennington Battle Monument is 306 feet tall and is often lit up at night. It's a much bigger attraction than the Frost grave.

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  16. I drive by this place at least a dozen times a year. It is still at least partly occupied and mail is delivered there. I have seen lights on at night.

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  17. This landmark is a treasured site as I travel on Route 9 to visit family that have moved to upstate New York. I hold my breath each trip hoping that the old building has survived. When I was a kid I used to think an old house set back from Route 9 in Wilmington, VT was haunted. It was large with leaded windows and grand architecture. I imagined a witch lived in it. On one trip my Mom and I noticed a light on in the house! The next year you could see repairs had been made. For many years afterward each trip brought a new joy as the house was visibly shaping up. I hope this happens one day for the Walloomsac Inn.

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    1. I think I may know which one you are talking about, in Wilmington. I grew up there, and there is a large estate set back from the rd, which is most definitely haunted, though not in a state of disrepair. My mother bought a mirror from a tag sale held there once when new owners bought it, (can u imagine the things for sale?! I would have loved to have gone and had a look around but I was a small child) and my sisters always made her cover it up because they said they could always see a woman in it! I have heard some things about the house, and the man who used to own it. They say he had grand parties there and that the top floor has a large ballroom! I always fantasized about it as well. Maybe its not the same place but it was the one that came to mind when u said that. It would be on your right as u drove towards Bennington, across from the river, not far past the boat docks as the lake turns into the river ( or vice versa)

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  18. We stayed in Bennington many years ago for a weekend. I was astounded at this house/Inn. I have pictures of it. I am glad it is still standing, it is a magnificent spooky looking place. I live in NC now and too old to travel north. But I will never forget that place.

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    1. Years ago, I made my 1st (and so far only-not by choice - I love Vermont)trip to Vermont. When we drove by that house in Bennington - I made my husband turn around and park so I could take pictures. The weirdest thing is what I said to my husband - "I have been here before - I have been in that house" I swear this was the 1st time in the life time I ever saw it. I have never forgotten that house, and have told many people my story. I would love to see it again.

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  19. See this place quite often, it's really cool looking, would love to see the inside myself. Someday maybe :)

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  20. I have been by this Inn many times enroute to my ski vacations in central Vermont. It always reminded me of the house on the old TV show "The Addams Family". Never knew it's history. Bennington is a really neat town with a ton of history and folklore. Are any of you familiar with the stories involving "The Bennington Triangle"?

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    1. The book "Weird New England" has a feature on the Bennington Triangle.

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  21. I have passed this many times during my youth in New York. We took Sunday drives to Bennington and I always admired this.I am in North Carolina but hope to see it again when visiting NY. Love it just the way it is! I never know about Robert Frost being buried so close...will definitely check that out as well. Thanks for the information.

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  22. We drove by this today on our way back to Syracuse, New York from the Keene, NH Pumpkin Festival. Still looks like somebody's living in the front part (facing the church), but the side/back (the part on the bend heading west out of town) must be closed off inside as it is fairly collapsing. Have half a mind to contact the Bennington Historian. Will start with a colleague, though, whose great, great, etc-grandfather was a minister at that church.

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  23. Why do you all want to pretty things up? It's lovely the way it is! I was married in that church and my 3 children were baptized there. Bennington is a wonderful town to live in.

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  24. Unbelievable! I have lived in Vermont, a few hours north of Bennington, for over 27 years and I have NEVER heard of this wonderful Inn! Grabbing my daughter and husband next weekend for a visit!

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    1. Were you able to get in and see the place? Me and my friends do videos on old historical places and we've been looking for places like this close to our area that is open to the public, or abandoned.

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  25. I spent my honeymoon there in Sept . 1978. It was fall and the leaves had turned. A yellow lantern hung in a large tree in front of the inn and got my attention. I stayed in the car and could view my husband thru the wavy original glass in the window .He was at a desk and behind him were all those key slotts and the inn keeper. It left a print on my brain as it was like stepping back into history. Years later I bought and restored an old home in Richfield Ohio. I knew from day one of the restoration I would put historic glass into all the windows . And so Farnam manor in Richfield Ohio now has wavy glass imported from Germany from Benheim glass. Lost the hose after NAFTA hit but I can never loose my memories. Ms. Susan

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  26. My wife and I went on a road trip yesterday and stopped to take pictures of this beautiful landmark. I try to respect peoples privacy so all my photography was done from across the street. Every time we travel that way, I bring the camera and I have shots from all seasons. We were standing in the common area across the street from the house and we saw someone sitting just inside one of the 2nd story windows. I gave her a smile and a big thumbs up to show her that I appreciated her house. A short while later, as we were leaving, I waved good-bye and much to my amazement, I received the shock of my life. She actually gave me the Finger! My wife and I laughed about this all the way home.
    Just because someone such as myself has an appreciation for history and fine construction, doesn't make them threatening. I was not trespassing or making myself obnoxious. I just have this love for this old house. I now can understand why this person is alone in this big old house that is meant to hear the laughter and footsteps of many people.
    I will continue to stop and take pictures whenever I am going by.

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  27. I've wondered for years why no one ever painted the place and/or spruced it up a bit. What I was told some forty odd years ago was that the town offered to paint it. The owners--who not only lived there, but continued to operate it as an inn--replied that they would agree to having it painted, on the condition that it not disrupt the privacy and pleasure of their guests, nor disrupt day to day operation. Since this is impossible, the paint job never happened. I expect that at some point in the not too distant future--if the owners don't do something to spruce it up--the town government will find a way to declare it unfit for human habitation and have it demolished as an eyesore. Which it's been for several decades.

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    1. If you look closer at the house, you will see that all the damage is just cosmetic. The sills appear to be solid and look at the ridge lines. The roof is straight as an arrow. Structurally, this house is sound. I am the one that posted the previous post in which I received the finger. I have plenty of photos of this house and while it does look rough it is entirely saveable. I did notice on my last trip by that they have had one of the chimneys replaced so there is hope that there is some effort to preserve.

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    2. I live in the area and have heard that the original front part of the building is brick with boards over it. I don't think the entire 3 story back addition is though.

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  28. You have share really fantastic photographs of haunted house. A haunted house means many things. There may be ghosts sightings, or simply unusual issues occurring that nobody can explain.

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  29. i saw this house in late Au guest on a return trip from Pa. the car just wised passed and i was like LOOK at that house.....just a glimpse and I loved it...all ways have love buildings and the older the better.....I am returning to photograph it...the owners i have learned do not like any trespassing..so i will be respectful of that. Two elderly sisters live there,a former resident says.It will be so sad and such a lost ,if it eventually
    falls down...i hope some how it will be saved.

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  30. I used to spend the summers in Manchester as a child and would always check out the windows as we drove in to town to look for ghosts (same with the Equinox before it was renovated)! What always amazed me was that despite the decay the windows were always crystal clean!

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  31. i was so thrilled to see this amazing place..Sept 2014 and got to return in Oct. 2014...I took photos standing right in front of the house standing on that side of the road...so quite close. It was a bright fall day...the windows where totally dark,you could not see any interior . If some one was way across the road ...they must have been using a very powerful zoom camera....which is quite invasive ...not needed unless you where trying to see in the windows! anyone would find this as trespassing. Be respectful.

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  32. I moved to the area recently and I love the old building and all the history here. My boyfriend had shown me this picture abut a year ago of this house. He was just driving and found it. Thought it was spooky and interesting so he snapped a picture, not knowing where it was we spent many hours googling it trying to find where it was. Today I found this link on a site I was ready about spooky cemeteries and I was so very excited. I know what I am doing this weekend. I think it's amazing and beautiful, and apparently so do many others, considering this thread has been going on for 3 years now. Thank you for sharing your finding. I look forward to many more historical finding I come across.

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  33. We have seen and taken photos of this Inn.....It is just now that I am finding the history behind it!!

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  34. Always was interested in this place, used to ride by as a kid in the 50s and 60s on the way to our summer camp. Was white back then with green trim as I recall. Had a big sign waloomsac inn in front. Just bought a photo of it from a local photographer. He had done a big photo on canvas of it I got a smaller print as I felt I couldn't spend the $ now on the larger pic. Love these big old inns! There's one in Sudbury that is falling down that I want to get a pic of before it totally collapses. So sad to see them go, a piece of history reduced to pictures.

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  35. Back in the late 70's, early 80's I stayed there for one night, despite reserving the room for 3 days. I have always been interested in the supernatural, and this place fascinated me. The one night was a nightmare, piano playing, a woman crying on and off all night. Worst of all was the sensation of being strangled, choked and struggling to breathe right in bed. Nothing I have ever experienced has affected me as this has. What an amazing experience...once in a lifetime, I hope!

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